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Google Assistant Gains Continued Conversation Mode For More Natural Google Home Interactions

Do you want to have a more natural conversation with your AI voice assistant? If saying wake words like "OK, Google" over and over again seem to robotic and stilted for you, Google is pushing out an update that it first announced at Google I/O called Continued Conversation. 

Continued Conversation will all you to invoke "OK, Google" or "Hey, Google" just once by voice, and then you'll be able to ask repeated questions without having to break out the wake words again. For example, you could say "Hey, Google, how far is it from Richmond, Virginia to Asheville, North Carolina"; "What's the temperature in Asheville"; and "Turn on the outside lights" while only using the wake words once.

If you see that the LEDs on your Google Home are still lit, then you know that you can continue with follow-up requests without a wake word. After 8 seconds, the Google Home will stop listening and you will be forced to use a wake word again. If you want to cut the Google Assistant off before the timeout period, you can simply say "thank you" or "stop".

The update is being rolled out today to the Google Home, Google Home Mini and Google Home Max. Continued Conversation can be enabled within the Google Assistant app by navigating to Settings --> Preferences --> Continued Conversation. From there, simply toggle the switch to enable the more natural feedback with the Google Assistant.

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