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Turn Your DJI Drone Into A Flying Flamethrower Of Death With This DIY Kit

Drone Flamethrower
Nothing about the image above terrifies me. Nope. I am completely calm that a flamethrower attachment now exists for drones. Or maybe they have always existed and I have just been blissfully unaware that people could rain down hellfire on a whim. Well, a whim and big bankroll—Throwflame's new TF-19 WASP flamethrower drone attachment costs $1,499.
I'm not panicking. Not one bit. After all, Throwflame designed this for heavy-duty drone platforms with a payload capacity of 5 pounds or more, not the cheap alternatives that one might buy at Walmart. The company's platform of choice is the DJI S1000, which is the same price. So going all-in on an aerial vomiting devil of fiery death is around $3,000.

You might be wondering why this even exists. Pshaw! Why wouldn't it? Just skip to the 1min7sec mark in the video embedded above to see how to properly handle a wasp's nest minding its own business out in the middle of nowhere. The only sensible thing to do is load up a gallon of fuel and burn those flying bugs to a crisp (they'd do the same to you, if they could!). Then pop open a can of beer and call the fire department, to let them know you're in over your head and probably started a forest fire. Oops!

Professionals are the real target buyers here, fortunately. Some of the advertised uses include clearing debris from power lines, pest management and nest elimination (by fire!), and forest fire containment through back-burns and pre-burns.

It is not intended for killing spiders in the house, lighting your grill because the push-button ignition no longer works, or showing your neighbor Bob that you run the block from this point forward. Besides, there's no way that something like this could be easily purchased and misused, right?

"Flamethrower drones are federally legal and not considered weapons; however, users are still required to comply with the FAA’s UAS rules in addition to local ordinances," FlameThrow says.

Okay, I take it back—I'm now officially terrified.

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